Theophrastus von Hohenheim, aka, Paracelus.

Overview: Paracelus took advantage of his knowledge as a doctor and alchemist, to re-shape the idea that was explained by Avicenna. He developed a theory that referred to the magnetic influence of the stars or cosmos, in relation to wounds and the different parts of the human body. He was a famous physician, alchemist, and astrologer of the German Renaissance.

Early Life

Paracelsus was born Philippus Aureolus Theophrastus Bombastus von Hohenheim (1493-1541), in the village of Einsiedeln, Switzerland. His name referred to Aurus Cornelius Celsus, the celebrated Roman encyclopaedist, one of the greatest medical writers of his time. Paracelsus’ father, Wilhelm Bombast von Hohenheim, was a Swabian (German) chemist and physician, and his mother was Swiss, presumed to have died when Paracelsus was a child.

Major Accomplishments

Paracelsus was a German-Swiss alchemist and Renaissance physician, whose main interest included alchemy, botany, physiology, astrology, science, and the occult. His personality was seen as stubborn and independent, an embattled reformer, and a revolutionary who insisted in using observations of nature rather than looking to ancient texts, a radical defiance of the medical practice at the time. He preferred experience and experimentation over knowledge. Written by Tel Asiado.

Early Life

Paracelsus was born Philippus Aureolus Theophrastus Bombastus von Hohenheim (1493-1541), in the village of Einsiedeln, Switzerland. His name referred to Aurus Cornelius Celsus, the celebrated Roman encyclopaedist, one of the greatest medical writers of his time. Paracelsus’ father, Wilhelm Bombast von Hohenheim, was a Swabian (German) chemist and physician, and his mother was Swiss, presumed to have died when Paracelsus was a child.

Major Accomplishments

Paracelsus was a German-Swiss alchemist and Renaissance physician, whose main interest included alchemy, botany, physiology, astrology, science, and the occult. His personality was seen as stubborn and independent, an embattled reformer, and a revolutionary who insisted in using observations of nature rather than looking to ancient texts, a radical defiance of the medical practice at the time. He preferred experience and experimentation over knowledge. Written by Tel Asiado.

Leave a Reply